Posted by: Peter Andrease

Posted on: June 8, 2012 8:03 am

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  1. Locate the FTP details of the website and download the entire contents of the current site through an FTP Program, e.g. Filezilla. This should include the wp-admin, wp-content, wp-includes folders and all loose files in the root.
  2. Access the database of the site via the current hosts CPanel or phpMyAdmin and save a copy of the entire database. The Hosts CPanel may have an option to simply backup the database or if using phpMyAdmin go to the ‘Export’ tab, select ‘Quick’ export method in Format ‘SQL’ and just hit ‘GO’ to save to your computer.
  3. Now you have the full contents of your wordpress site, so on the new hosting you will need to create a new database. Again this would need to be done in your new hosts CPanel or hosting panel. When you create your new database make a note of the database name, username and password set.
  4. Once the database is created, you will need to add your downloaded database file. If using phpMyAdmin, select ‘Import’, browse for your database file and hit ‘GO’.
  5. Your database will now be in place, if you are transferring to a different domain name you will need to change the name in two locations on the database. So while in phpMyAdmin go to the wp_options table and the first row item should be ‘siteurl’, click ‘Edit’ and change this to your new domain name. Now go to Page 2 and near the top there will be a ‘home’ row with the site name in again, change this also.
  6. With your database ready you can now get the site in place. Go to your downloaded site and first open the wp-config.phpfile in the root and change the following in red to your new database settings:

    define(‘DB_NAME’, DATABASE NAME);

    define(‘DB_USER’, USERNAME);

    define(‘DB_PASSWORD’, PASSWORD);

    define(‘DB_HOST’, ‘localhost’);

    The MySQL hostname should always be ‘localhost’, unless your new hosting has a specific host type.

  7. Now access the FTP of your new site and remove or backup any files currently there, then upload your entire site to the root.
  8. The website will now be in place so if you need to change nameservers or IPS Tag then you can do this now. Once any transfers are complete, your site will show in the new location, so test the site and subpages in a browser and you should be all done! If any problems occur during this process then contact the hosting company who would be able to provide specific details.

Posted by: SEO Positive

Posted on: August 26, 2011 2:13 pm

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Google Analytics is an essential tool that all website owners should at least be aware of, analytics allows you to track a lot of information about your site, it informs you of all the activities that a user carries out, for example, where they directed from and how long they stayed on the site.

How to Create a Google Analytics Account

To create a Google Analytics account, you will need a Google account this doesn’t mean you need to create a Gmail account, simply go to http://www.google.co.uk and on the top right hand side of the screen you will see a sign in button.

Google

After you have clicked on the sign in button you will be taken to a page that looks like this:

create google acc

Once you have clicked the Create Account Button, you will be sent to a details page, fill out your details that you would like to use, remember creating a Google account and using analytics is completely free. I suggest that you use the same email address and other details that you use for the business or webpage that you are setting up your analytics for, however if you have multiple business’ then you could use any email address or create multiple Google accounts.

Google Details

After you have filled out the form, it will send you to a page that confirms your account creation. You then need to go back to Google’s home page and again go to the sign in button. Your account should already be in the username section so just add your password and you should then be sent to a page like this:

Google Confirm

Click on the verify button then go to your inbox and look for a message from “account-verification-noreply@google.com”. In the email you receive it will say “Welcome to Google Accounts. To activate your account and verify your email address, please click the following link:” if you click the link directly below it will take you to a page that looks similar to this:

Account Google

So now you have your Google account all set up, we must move to setting up the analytics account.

How to Create Your Analytics Account

Visit the Analytics site: http://www.google.com/analytics/ and click the sign up button which is located on the left hand side:

Google Analytics

You will then be taken to a login page, just enter your email address and password for the Google account you just created, then you will be directed to a sign up page, just click the sign up button on the bottom left hand side. Once you have been directed again, you are shown a form for your analytics account, it is essential that you enter all information correctly as any mistakes will affect your analytics results and may even cause it not to work.

Google Analytics Details

You will then have to enter your full name and agree to Google’s Terms and Conditions, after you have done that you will be directed to a page showing the tracking code for your analytics, but the way I will show you how to add analytics to you site, you will not need this code. You will need another code. So click onto the save and finish button.

Analytics Codes

Adding Analytics to Your Site

Log onto your Content Management System, yours could be a WordPress, Joomla or Create however there are many more. Once logged in look for a an edit site information tab, once on here look for Google analytics and add the UA code, If your CMS does not have this, then there will be a plug in available, make sure to check ratings and so on to see if the plug in is functional and users are satisfied with the plug in. Install your chosen plug in into your CMS, follow the instructions and add your UA number to the plug in.

Checking Your Analytics

Google Analytics should take no longer than 72 hours to register, but the majority of the time it is done quicker, to check your analytics, simply visit: the analytics home page, the account overview page will show very brief information, but clicking the report button will show you much more in-depth information.

Posted by: SEO Positive

Posted on: November 17, 2010 9:23 am

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We’re big fans of WordPress at SEO Positive, purely for its ease and speed of development as well as the sheer number of awesome plugins.

But WordPress also has a habit of being “too good” and puts quite a substantial amount of junk code in your websites/blogs, this tutorial will show you how to remove this code.

WordPress Header Stripping

WordPress has a habit of putting a lot of tags in your header that generally aren’t needed such as the “index”, “EditURL”, “next” and “generator” meta and link tags. These are surprisingly easy to strip out because WordPress has a great function to do just that.

remove_action( 'wp_head', 'adjacent_posts_rel_link_wp_head' );
remove_action( 'wp_head', 'rsd_link' );
remove_action( 'wp_head', 'wlwmanifest_link' );
remove_action( 'wp_head', 'wp_generator' );

The above will remove pretty much all of the junk out of your WordPress headers leaving them squeeky clean. For an example of what this strips out visit SEO Positive and view the source.

To use the above code, simply paste this into your themes functions.php and save/refresh your page to see the difference.

WordPress “role” attributes

WordPress is a very semantically conscious CMS and blogging system and this is proven by viewing your template source and noticing the “role” attribute on most of the containers throughout the code.

The role attribute is NOT just a WordPress piece of code and you CAN delete these but these are fairly clever pieces of code aimed for search engines. Its kind of (simply put) the closest thing to the semantic-ness of HTML 5 or XHTML 2. The role attribute is to distinguish what each container is used for, see here for the documentation on this attribute.

I will briefly explain the most important and used “role” attributes below:

  • role=”banner”
    • This is to tell engines and screen readers that this is the primary area for images, big text and advertisements.
  • role=”navigation”
    • This is to distinguish navigational buttons for the website, its only recommended to have the one of these any sub menus (seperate columns etc) just leave as they are not primary navigational areas.
  • role=”main”
    • This is the most important of the roles as this tells everything that this is the main content area of the website

WordPress is filled with all kinds of clever bits and bobs to help you develop your sites/blogs and with a range of plugins to help you achieve your perfect site. We use SEO Ultimate to help us diagnose our websites and better achieve SEO domination which contains fantastic tools for inserting code into your headers and footers for analytics and validation tags etc.

Posted by: SEO Positive

Posted on: June 10, 2010 7:50 am

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So there are many different content management systems available, each with there own pro’s and cons but today we are going to focus on the two largest PHP content management systems, Joomla (1.5+) and WordPress (2.8+)

At SEO Positive we use both of these to satisfy our clientele and even our own projects as they allow for quick development and total control over the content.

But which one should I use for my project?

This depends entirely on the goal of your project. Below we have outlined features of both CMS’

WordPress

  • Instant blogging
  • 1 minute to set up, with no knowledge of programming necessary
  • Instant theme installation
  • Search engines love WordPress
  • Stable platform with very few bugs/catches
  • Automatic plug in installation/updates and activation
  • 100% control over the theme’s layout/colours etc
  • JavaScript is jQuery powered

Joomla

  • Stable platform to build any large scale website on
  • Instant page creation
  • Menu management
  • Dedicated media manager (upload and download)
  • Fairly easy plug in installation/management
  • Instant theme installation
  • Nearly 100% control over the theme and all layouts and colours
  • JavaScript is powered by MooTools

They have a lot more features than the above mentioned ones, but I’m going to leave it there on that, if you still can’t decide what is best for your website perhaps I should explain a little more about them?

Joomla is a content management system, for building websites into. So being dedicated to a purpose would seem like a pro to add to the list, but it does come with its con’s. Joomla is technical to update and manage, with a complicated and sometimes confusing management area it can be tricky to get used to for anyone of a lesser technical mind where as WordPress is a blogging platform that happens to be fantastic for a quick website build with CMS. WordPress also has an incredibly easy to use management area, everything is laid out in a way that you can’t confuse and everything is labeled in a way you can’t find tricky.

Joomla stands trumps for large scale websites (30+ pages) and WordPress would suite more a smaller website (up to 30 pages) as it has no internal banner, footer or menu managers.

Joomla also stands up trumps with themes as you can use multiple themes throughout the site depending on what page your users are currently viewing/reading, with its banner, footer and menu managers and custom ‘modules’ feature there is nothing you can’t customise in Joomla and this wins it for us here at SEO Positive over WordPress as to build a bespoke website and give any client total control of there site we find Joomla perfect.

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